Falling Stars Patriotic Tea Towel

Oh My Stars Patriotic Tea Towel Well hello! Are you enjoying the summer? I’m finding that summer break is just as busy as the school year, just more fun. Summer camp is getting the girls out for a few hours everyday, but I do feel like my uninterrupted crafting time is diminished. Though, I did find some time this week to make a tea towel for the kitchen to celebrate Independence Day. Remember the Falling Shamrock Tea Towel from back in March? Well this tea towel is very similar. Just the 4th of July version. I love using DecoArt Ink Effects on 100% cotton material, because it gives the design a watercolor effect. If you want bolder colors, make sure your fabric is at least 60% synthetic material. Oh My Stars Patriotic Tea Towel Supplies You’ll also need an iron. Paint a bunch of stars in various sizes, using the red and blue Ink Effects. I did a quick Google search for star outlines and traced a bunch of them. There were about 60. I am so not talented enough to freehand draw the stars. Oh My Stars Patriotic Tea Towel Let the paint dry for 45 minutes. Lay out your tea towel on top of another towel for ironing. Spray it with the base coat (if your fabric is less than 60% synthetic material) and let dry. Place your design painted side down, on the tea towel. Place a clean piece of paper on top of that. Iron on the cotton setting, with no steam, for about 3 minutes, constantly keeping the iron in motion.  Peel off the paper, and you should see your beautiful design transferred to the tea towel. Repeat process until done. I reused some of the stars I already transferred to layer a lighter transfer on top of the other ones. See photographic instructions here. Oh My Stars Patriotic Tea Towel The whole project only takes a couple of hours. So make one today! Patriotic Tea Towel xoxo   {This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links, I may receive a small compensation to help pay for the blog.}

 

Linked to ~ Moonlight & Mason Jars, Someday Crafts, Link Party Palooza, Creative Collection, Think Pink Sunday, Sunday Showcase, Merry MondayNifty Thrifty Sunday, Submarine Sunday, Happiness Is Homemade, Our Sunday Best Showcase, 3 Mango Seeds, Huckleberry Love, CRAFT, Inspiration Monday, Mix It Up Monday, Mad Skills Party, Frugal Crafty Home, Inspire Me Monday, Elizabeth Joan Designs, Tutorials and Tips, Time To Sparkle, The Makers, Inspired Weekends

Striped Planter with Liquid Gold Leaf

Gold Leaf Striped Planter - www.sparklepantsgirl.com Have you ever had one of those days where you need a quick and easy project to make you feel productive? I totally needed that when I painted these pots for my succulents. I was feeling pretty lazy, the house was a mess and was anticipating a visit from a special family member (aka mom). So I painted these pots with liquid gold leaf for a dramatic flair to otherwise boring planters.

 

Supplies

<<above supply list contains affiliate links>>

planter Grab your planter pots, take them outside and spray paint them black (or white…or neon pink. Please do it in neon pink! And send me some pics if you do!!). Spray them evenly. See where the paint pooled on bottom of that planter above?? Right then I noticed that I was standing on the home of fire ants. Don’t do that. It hurts.

blackplanter Be sure to flip the planter over and paint the top rim.

vinylstrips Use a thinly cut strip of vinyl and wrap it around the planter, where you want your stripe to be. Repeat at the bottom of where your stripe will be. Remember, we aren’t going for perfection here.  We’re going for quick and easy.  The vinyl is just a guide for painting, so it’s okay if it isn’t perfectly straight.

vinylpla <<I just realized that you could make a decent  guide line using thick rubber bands. Next time.>>

liquidgold Make sure you’re outside for this part. The liquid gold leaf stinks. It will give you a headache if you aren’t in a well-ventilated area.

goldpaint Paint with your foam brush. The paint goes on very smoothly. Let it dry. Carefully remove the vinyl by pulling it straight up. Fill your planters with beautiful succulents.

Gold-Leafed Planters   All done. Now go clean your house.   xoxo

 

 

Linked to – Moonlight & Mason Jars, Whimseybox, Show + Tell, Link Party Palooza, Think Pink Sunday, Merry Monday, The Makers

Modernize a Vintage Side Table with Americana Decor Chalky Paint

Hi there! This post is sponsored by DecoArt Americana Home Decor and their new Chalky Finish Paint line. Of course all opinions are mine and only mine.

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I love the look of vintage furniture updated to look modern. I personally have never painted any furniture before, I’ve always been too scared that I’m going to mess it up. Then one day while out thrifting, I came across this little beauty. It has clean lines, it’s mid-century, and for $15 I wouldn’t feel too badly if I totally messed it up. Plus it fit in my little car!

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I had heard about chalky finish paint before. You don’t have to prime or sand first, it distresses easily, you can coat it with a wax or a varnish, or just leave it as is with the matte, chalk like finish. Seriously, how can you mess up? I’m pretty sure you can’t.

Supplies-
Americana Home Decor Chalky Paint in Everlasting
Americana Home Decor Light Satin Varnish
2 or 3 Foam Brushes

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The paint went on ridiculously smoothly. I applied the first coat, let it dry for 2 hours then applied the second. I found some leftover walnut stain that I had and wiped that on the drawer, to really bring out the brightness of the white chalky paint.

The next morning I applied two coasts of the Light Satin Varnish. This stuff is amazing. It gave the piece such a smooth finish with a very minimal sheen. And it’s so soft to the touch.

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Here is the finished piece! Not too shabby for my very first venture into painting furniture, right? I cannot wait to use more of the Chalky Finish Paint colors and techniques like layering and distressing.

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You can find the Americana Decor Chalky Finish paint, finishing waxes, varnish, brushes and stencils! at Home Depot and Michaels.

Chalky Finish Side Table

 

Check out this post on the DecoArt Blog, for more Chalky Finish Paint tips.

Happy Painting!

Jes

Linked to – Link Party Palooza, Inspired Weekends, Nifty Thrifty Sunday, The Makers, Moonlight & Mason Jars, The Party Bunch, The Creative Collection, Inspire Me Please

Canning Jar and Chicken Wire Lanterns

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Ball jars, Mason jars, canning jars… Whatever you want to call them, they are fun and they have made their way out of the kitchen and into home decor. Somewhere I had seen some canning jars covered in chicken wire being sold for $25 to $30. Well, there was no way I was going to pay that much for something I felt like I could make myself.

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Supplies: Chicken wire, canning jars, flat nose plier, cutting plier, spray paint, wire (24 gauge) candles or LED tea lights

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So start by lining up the  lip of the jar at the smooth edge of the chicken wire. Cut the wire so that it wraps all the way around the jar, and overlaps an inch or two. I  used the hexagonal rows as my indicators. You want one or two inches  of the chicken wire to hang over the bottom of the jar.

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Twist together the ends of the chicken wire together, pulling it pretty tight, particularly at the top portion of the jar. Use the flat nose pliers or wear protective gloves and make sure you’ve had your tetanus shot, those edges are pokey little buggers. Then pull out the jar from the bottom so that you can really wrap the wires tight.

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Wrap the wires and tuck them in themselves the best you can. Snip off any ends of wires that are poking out.

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Now is the time to add a handle if you want to hang it. I added the handle after painting it so that the handle showed up better in the picture. Slip a long length of 24 or 22 gauge wire through the top of the chicken wire. You are then going to double-up the wire, wrap the wire around the chicken wire a couple of times to secure it, then twist the  doubled up wire until the end. Wrap the loose end of the handle on the opposite side of the chicken wire. Wrap it so that it’s tight and will handle the weight of the jar if you choose to hang it.

***DISCLAIMER: I had a lighted candle in the jar and the handle did get hot. Be cautious of this so that you don’t burn your fingers.***

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Take the chicken wire outside and spray paint it. Obviously, I chose gold, because I loved it with the blue Ball jars. But the ones I saw for sale were clear jars with oil-rubbed bronze chicken wire. Or get colorful! I’d love to see some with neon painted chicken wire!

Once the paint is dry, slip the jar back into the chicken wire from the bottom. Tighten the wire as best as you can, being careful, because you don’t want to scrape of  the paint.

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Start pinching together the chicken wire at the bottom of the jar. Cut off any amount that looks to be extra. Then wrap the wires at the base of the jar together so that it is tight and will hold the jar. Try to keep it as even as possible, because you want the lanterns to sit flat.

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Put candles in them, use them as a vase or plant some succulents in them. These are going to be perfect for our lovely suppers we will be eating outside (at least until the weather gets too hot!)

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I adore the way they look hanging on the cement wall!

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xoxo-

Jessa

 

Linked to these fabulous blog parties – Moonlight and Mason Jars, Project Stash, The Makers, Link Party Palooza, Be Different Act Normal, Think Pink Sunday, Nifty Thrifty Things, Tip Me Tuesday, The Creative Collection

Kaleidoscope Easter Eggs

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Happy spring! With Easter coming up in a few weeks it’s a great time to add a little color to your decor. The color of these straws that I found at Ikea screamed spring, and were my inspiration for the colors in these Easter eggs. I really enjoy the painted geometric angles and the hints of gold on these eggs. Gold is super popular right now, but I’m ridiculously slow to embrace it and add it into my decor. Baby steps here, baby steps.

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So run to the craft store and pick up a couple packages of paper maché eggs, gold spray paint, a sheet of craft vinyl and some paint.

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Go outside and spray the eggs gold. I did do some white ones, but they didn’t look as great. While the golden eggs are drying, cut small strips of vinyl, like about 1/4 of an inch wide. I used a paper cutter, and the sizes of my strips varied, but they were all close to the right size.

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Once the golden eggs are dry, wrap the vinyl strip on the egg. You can place it strategically or haphazard, whichever suits your fancy. Just make sure the vinyl is stuck smoothly on the egg, so you can minimize paint seepage.

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I used DecoArt’s Americana paints, in Poodleskirt Pink, Peony Pink, Bahama Blue, and Lemon Yellow. I also mixed the yellow and Peony Pink to make a pretty orange. No, this post isn’t sponsored by DecoArt, I’m just a big fan of their products.

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Use a quality paint brush to dab the paint on the egg, varying the colors.  Try to stay within the lines (Sometimes I still have problems doing that). I left some spots empty, so that more gold shows. Yeah, I’m daring.

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Let them dry completely and apply a second coat of paint. Once your paint is dry, gently peel off the vinyl. Make sure you pull straight up, or you might take some of the color off with the vinyl. I did that and I was pretty sad about it.

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That’s it! Now you just need to find a pretty way to display your Kaleidoscope Easter Eggs. Put them in a bowl on the coffee table, hanging from a little tree, or stick them on a candle stick.

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Here are the white ones… Pretty, but not striking like the gold.

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Kaleidoegg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Xoxo-

Jessa

 

Linked to –  Link Party Palooza, The Makers, Tip Junkie, Show & Tell, Be Different Act Normal, Inspired Weekends, Nifty Thrifty Things, Think Pink Sunday

Falling Shamrock Tea Towel

Make a shamrock tea towel at sparklepantsgirl.com

It’s March! Spring is here in for us in Arizona and just around the corner for the rest of you. As a child back in Oregon, I used to spend hours hunting for the elusive four-leafed clover with my grandmother. I guess because of that shamrocks are rather special to me. My kitchen needed a little green, so I made this shamrock tea towel using DecoArt’s Ink Effects, which is a fabric transfer ink that you can paint on to plain paper and then iron on to fabric. Fun, huh?

Make a shamrock tea towel at sparklepantsgirl.com

Now, Ink Effects is meant to be used on fabric that is less than 30% cotton for a more saturated transfer, but the towels that I used are 100% cotton and gave me this watercolor effect that I love.

Supplies: DecoArt Ink Effects in green, teal and blue, Ink Effects Base Coat, paint brush, plain copy paper, cotton dish towel (here), shamrock template or stencil, iron.

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Start by tracing or stencilling the shamrocks. I just traced around these felt ones that I bought. I traced lots and lots of different sizes. I also did an image search and traced some shamrocks right off of the computer screen. I guess I could have just printed them, silly me.

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Once you have quite a few shamrocks it’s time to start painting. The color of the paint appears really dark on the paper, but don’t worry, it will match the color of the cap of the paint. I promise.

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I painted the clovers in a thin layer of paint, then let them dry for an hour. I used way more green than teal or blue.20140305-163903.jpg

Once the paint is dry, spray the towel with the Ink Effects Base Coat. The Base Coat helps the ink transfer better to fabrics that are less than 40% synthetic material. Let the Base Coat dry for a few minutes while the iron is heating up. Heat up the iron to the hottest non-steam setting it has. I found a little travel iron that has a switch to turn off the steam and still be on a cotton setting. Between that function and its little size, it worked perfect for this project.

Cut around a shamrock or two, and lay the paper painted side down on the towel. Place a blank piece of paper on top of that and start ironing. The transfer needs about 3 minutes of heat from the iron. Make sure that the steam is off and to move the iron around so that you get an even transfer.

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Take off that shamrock and iron on another. I used some of the shamrock transfers more than once to get a lighter transfer. The effect looks like watercolor and I love the blues and the greens.

I read that on cotton the colors will fade a bit in the wash, even with the Base Coat. So I hand washed it in cool water and it faded very slightly. Yay!

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If you look closely, there’s a lucky four-leafed clover in there for you!

 

Bye for now!

Jessa

 

Linked to these lovely blog parties… Moonlight and Mason Jars, Link Party Palooza, Nifty Thrifty Things, Inspired Weekends, Think Pink, Sunday Showcase, Tip Me Tuesday, The Makers, Show and Tell

 

 

{This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links, I may receive a small compensation.}

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